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Do distracted driving laws cover smartwatches?

Canadian Press -- It's up to the police to decide, says ON's Transportation Ministry

We're not sure yet, says a spokesman for ON's provincial police force

Although numerous smartwatches have hit the market in the last couple of years, it's expected Apple's simply named Watch will really kick start interest in the devices when it's released in early 2015

That delay buys authorities some time to figure out whether current distracted driving legislation already covers the new class of devices

"There's nothing illegal about looking at your watch to see what time it is, but if you're consumed by the functions of the watch [that's different]

Ticket will come down to police interpretation

Some features available on the device may be permitted under the province's distracted driving provisions, while others w  (go to article)

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Police remove shale gas supporter from anti-shale event

CBC-Angry man worried about losing job attends Anti-Shale Gas Alliance news conference in Moncton -- Police had to be called to an anti-shale gas news conference in Moncton on Wednesday morning to deal with an angry man.

Jim Emberger, a spokesperson for the New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance, says the man arrived before the scheduled event and began shouting and pushing people around because he is afraid of losing his job if there is a ban on fracking in the province.

Police officers had to remove the man, said Emberger.

Emberger says his group is concerned that politicians running in the provincial election don't understand all of the facts regarding their concerns about hydraulic-fracturing.

As a result, New Brunswickers who are looking for the facts about shale gas aren't getting them from the current political debate and they're being misled, he said.

 (go to article)

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U.S. crude output surges to highest since ' 86 on shale boom

worldoil.com -- U.S. crude production climbed to the highest level in more than 28 years last week as the shale boom moved the country closer to energy independence.

Output rose 248,000 bpd to 8.838 million, the most since March 1986, according to Energy Information Administration data. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has unlocked supplies from shale formations in the central U.S., including the Bakken in North Dakota and the Eagle Ford in Texas.

“The shale boom hasn’t run its course yet,” Michael Lynch, president of Strategic Energy & Economic Research in Winchester, Massachusetts, said by phone. “The U.S. is in a good and improving position as far as oil supply is concerned.”
 (go to article)

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A System to Cut City Traffic That Just Might Work

Wired -- Traffic sucks. Congestion is bad for the environment, health (see: Beijing), and maybe most importantly, our sanity. One solution gaining in popularity amongst urban governments is the congestion charging scheme, in which drivers pay a toll to enter designated downtown areas. London, Stockholm, and Milan all have such systems in place, and New York came close to trying it out in 2007. Those efforts are all whippersnappers compared to Singapore’s program, which was introduced in 1975. Over the past few decades, the city-state has upgraded the system, which now uses radio transmitters to detect cars entering designated areas.

But two MIT researchers think they’ve got a better way of doing things. They’ve tested out a new method—and won an award doing it  (go to article)

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Federal study of Pennsylvania fracking site finds no water pollution

The Times-Picayune-AP -- The final report from a landmark federal study on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, found no evidence that chemicals or brine water from the gas drilling process moved upward to contaminate drinking water at a site in western Pennsylvania.

The Department of Energy report, released Monday, was the first time an energy company allowed independent monitoring of a drilling site during the fracking process and for 18 months afterward. After those months of monitoring, researchers found that the chemical-laced fluids used to free gas stayed about 5,000 feet below drinking water supplies.

Scientists used tracer fluids, seismic monitoring and other tests to look for problems, and created the most detailed public report to date about how fracking affects adjacent rock structures.

 (go to article)

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Engineers develop algorithms to switch out and recharge battery modules in electric cars

Science Daily -- Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company.
Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules. They named the project Modular Battery Exchange and Active Management, or M-BEAM for short.
Engineers have already purchased and converted a car, a 2002 four-door Volkswagen Golf. They also built all the modules for one of the two battery packs they plan to use and are now looking for sponsors for their project, in  (go to article)

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Electric vehicles are getting cleaner, group says

Fuel Fix -- As the U.S. shifts away from coal-fired power plants and electric vehicles get more efficient, most Americans now live in regions where electric vehicles produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions than the most efficient hybrid cars, according to a new analysis.

While touted as more environmentally friendly options, electric vehicles have been criticized for contributing to the carbon footprint by relying on electricity generated in many cases from coal-fired power plants.

Related: Electric vehicles’ carbon footprint depends on the state

However, recent changes in electricity markets combined with technological improvements to electric vehicles led the Union of Concerned Scientists this week to conclude that electric vehicles are getting cleaner. In a new report out this week, the nonprofit  (go to article)

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Six Reasons Why the United Nations Should Not Intervene on Fossil Fuel Use (A Response to the Misgui

Forbes -- Tens of thousands of protesters will be swarming New York this Sunday to encourage the United Nations to call for drastic cuts for fossil fuels. They think they are doing the moral thing in encouraging the UN to oppose the use of coal, oil, and natural gas.

In fact they’re supporting policies that would cut billions of lives short. Literally. Before anyone picks up a protest sign or petitions the UN, they should know these six facts about fossil fuels and human life.  (go to article)

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Charge your phone using ‘urine-tricity’

CNBC -- Waste not, want not, the saying goes, and researchers at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory are turning something we all produce – urine – into clean electricity, or 'urine-tricity'.
It sounds outlandish, but earlier this year, at the Reinvent the Toilet Fair in New Delhi, India – co-hosted by the Indian Department of Biotechnology and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation – the team exhibited a functional urinal that was able to charge a phone using just urine, a world first.
 (go to article)

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Medlock: Without oil exports, drilling rigs could flee U.S.

Houston Chronicle -- WASHINGTON — It will take a “train wreck” of falling prices, declining oil production and idle drilling rigs before the United States lifts its longstanding ban on exporting crude, a noted economist predicted Wednesday.
Analysts have warned those are the possible outcomes if existing discounts on U.S. crude grow even larger and domestic oil production exceeds the ability of the nation’s refiners to process it.
 (go to article)

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An independent Scotland could become an energy industry powerhouse

Fortune --
If the Scots vote to secede from the U.K., nearly all of the British North Sea oil fields, as well as half of its natural gas fields, would end up under Edinburgh’s control.

Scotland would be wise to wave goodbye to the United Kingdom and vote in favor of independence.

While there are both positives and negatives to cutting the cord with Westminster, there is one factor in particular that should tip the scales in favor of the “Yes” camp—energy. Nearly all of the U.K.’s North Sea oil fields, as well as half of its natural gas fields, would end up under Edinburgh’s control, turning Scotland into an energy exporting powerhouse.

London has done a poor job managing the North Sea, leading to sharp declines in production across the board. An independent Scotland could wipe the slate clean and  (go to article)

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Toyota quietly rolls 2015 fuel cell car into town

USA Today -- SAN FRANCISCO – One automaker's vision of the transportation future sat parked under a broiling sun not far from AT&T Park baseball stadium Tuesday. But the blackout tint on the sedan's windows wasn't to keep the interior cool, but hidden.
Toyota quietly rolled into town with the newest addition to its eco-conscious fleet, the 2015 FCV. That stands for Fuel Cell Vehicle and translates to hydrogen power. The car hits dealers in the middle of next year, but the company remains mum on pricing and what surrounds the passengers.  (go to article)

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Judge overturns Uber ride-sharing ban in Germany

BBC -- A German judge has overturned a nationwide ban on one of the services offered by the alternative taxi firm Uber.

The temporary injunction banned the start-up from offering its UberPop ride-sharing service in the country.

Frankfurt Regional Court Judge Frowin Kurth ruled that taxi companies in the country had waited too long to request an emergency injunction.

The German Taxi Association, Taxi Deutschland, said that it would appeal.

"The taxi industry accepts competitors who comply with the law. Uber does not," it said in a statement.

For its part Uber welcomed the judge's decision.

"UberPOP is revolutionising transport in cities and beyond by helping to create smarter cities with more transport choices," the firm said.  (go to article)

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Five Years Later, Chrysler’s Gamble on Ram Trucks Is Paying Off

The New York Times -- WARREN, Mich. — In December, the sprawling, four million-square-foot factory here where workers assemble Ram pickup trucks, along conveyors that weave for more than 30 miles, suddenly went quiet. Thousands of workers looked on where a makeshift stage, draped in black, had been assembled. Sergio Marchionne, Chrysler Group’s chairman and chief executive, stepped up to address the crowd. In the dark days of Chrysler’s bankruptcy — when the company barely escaped extinction thanks to a taxpayer bailout and the purchase by Mr. Marchionne’s Fiat of a major stake, which later turned into ownership — such a staged display and work stoppage could have meant trouble. But not this time.Mr. Marchionne was there to acknowledge an industry award for the truck, but, more important, to convey a simple mes  (go to article)

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Maryland faces worse climate-driven flooding, report warns

The Baltimore Sun -- Baltimore and Annapolis are likely to suffer serious coastal flooding again before this century is over, and people and property in Ocean City and on the lower Eastern Shore face even greater risks as climate change accelerates sea level rise along Maryland's extensive shoreline, warns a new report. Drawing on new government data and projections, Climate Central, a nonprofit research and information group, calculates that 41,000 homes with 55,000 residents in the state are in danger under mid-range sea-level rise projections if storm-driven flooding surges five feet above the high tide line -- which it did in the Baltimore area and elsewhere during Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003. But the number at risk jumps to 94,000 homes with 132,000 residents if worst-case projections of rising seas com  (go to article)

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Scotland Independence Impacts to Energy Resources

New York Times -- If you are wondering how the Scotland Independence vote could affect UK energy sources, this article may answer questions...  (go to article)

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Global shift away from cars would save US$100 trillion, eliminate 1,700 megatons of carbon dioxide p

ScienceDaily/University of California, Davis -- More than $100 trillion in cumulative public and private spending, and 1,700 megatons of annual carbon dioxide (CO2) -- a 40 percent reduction of urban passenger transport emissions -- could be eliminated by 2050 if the world expands public transportation, walking and cycling in cities, according to a new report released by the University of California, Davis, and the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP).

Further, an estimated 1.4 million early deaths could be avoided annually by 2050 if governments require the strongest vehicle pollution controls and ultralow-sulfur fuels, according to a related analysis of these urban vehicle activity pathways by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) included in the report.

"Transportation, driven by rapid...  (go to article)

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This stained-glass driverless car is one designer's vision of the future

Yahoo! Autos -- British designer Dominic Wilcox has a distinct vision as to what the future of transportation will look like by the year 2059. Wilcox believes we will live in world free from traffic incidents, traveling in driverless cocoons that require none of the same safety regulations we see today – such as airbags, seat belts and even bumpers.

Debuting at the Dezeen and Mini Frontiers design festival in London this week, an exhibition set to demonstrate the future of mobility, Wilcox has unveiled his vision for the future: an autonomous car festooned in cathedral-like stained glass windows, with no seats inside – just a bed.  (go to article)

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Return of the $3 Gallon? U.S Gas Prices Are Falling Fast

BloombergBusinessweek -- The national average price of regular unleaded, now at $3.38 a gallon, is down 8 percent from the end of June. Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at GasBuddy.com, thinks this year will bring the cheapest autumn gasoline prices since 2010. Last year drivers spent $40 billion at the pump in September, and Kloza thinks that bill will be at least $2 billion lower in 2014. The savings at the pump should help stimulate consumer spending in other parts of the economy.

Gas prices are cheapest in the South and highest in the Northwest. Shale oil being produced in North Dakota and Texas has had an easier time traveling south and east, while fewer trains have headed west, across the Rockies and into Washington and Oregon (though that is starting to change). Still, it’s a big difference. The average...  (go to article)

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Little Recalled Corvette: GM Stops Sale, Prepares Recall for 2015 Chevrolet Corvettes

Popular Mechanics -- The bad news? GM is about to issue two more recalls. The worse news? Both actions cover one of our favorite cars, the C7 Chevrolet Corvette.

According to GM, a stop-sale notice has been sent to Chevrolet dealers who may have in stock some of the 2800 Corvettes potentially affected by two problems. The first problem afflicts approximately 2000 cars, which may have a driver’s side airbag that could come unseated when deployed in a crash, increasing the risk of injury.
 (go to article)

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'This is Where the World Pays Attention' says USU Biofuels Scientist

Utah State Today -- Yet again, Utah State University ingenuity and perseverance were on display at Utah’s famed Bonneville Salt Flats as Aggie undergrad Mike Morgan set new speed records with USU-made biofuels.

“This is where the world pays attention,” says Morgan, a biochemistry major who raced a modified light truck in multiple trials during the Utah Salt Flats Association’s 2014 World of Speed event Sept. 6-9. “We’re demonstrating biofuels rival petroleum-based fuels in performance.”

Using a biodiesel blend made at USU from algae, Morgan drove a privately owned Dodge Rampage in a heavy headwind to 132.620 mph. In the same vehicle, powered with USU-made, 100 percent safflower biodiesel, he cruised to 133.815 mph.  (go to article)

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New software targets credit card thieves at gas pumps

Money Talks News -- New anti-theft software is helping gas stations crack down on credit card fraud at the pump.

Pay-at-the-pump terminals at self-serve gas stations are the perfect place for thieves to rack up charges with stolen credit or debit cards. With no one to personally witness the transaction, thieves have little chance of getting caught.
 (go to article)

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Tesla Wants to Pay Hackers a Full-Time Salary to Break Its Cars

Popular Mechanics -- Computer hackers, call off your salvos against Microsoft and stop trying to wreck our blog: Break into a Model S and Tesla might hire you.

The electric automaker wants to hire up to 30 full-time employees from the hacking community, as evidenced from its display at the recent annual Def Con conference in Las Vegas.

Tesla wants more programmers to find security holes in its cars, all of which come with internet connections, perform over-the-air software updates, and have an infotainment screen the size of a Times Square billboard that is used to control everything from navigation to the door locks. Although the Def Con event wasn’t a Tesla “hackathon” like what happened in China—there, hackers took control of the car’s sunroof, lights, and horn—it did allow Tesla to recruit experts for wh  (go to article)

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Spencer on the Case: It’s Not About the Climate

Power Line -- We noted here last week that a UN “Leaders Climate Summit” is getting under way in New York next week, but that no world leaders are showing up. Obama, however, is planning to turn up, though that does not falsify our conclusion that no world leaders are showing up.  (go to article)

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Fracking Bans Enrage Coloradans Sitting on Energy Riches

Bloomberg News -- Mineral owners left out of the energy boom in Colorado and other states are mobilizing to fight local fracking bans they say are depriving them of billions of dollars in oil and natural-gas royalties.
Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper repeatedly invoked the rights of his state’s 630,000 royalty holders to head off ballot measures that would have given local governments more control over energy drilling.  (go to article)

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Top Vehicle Features for Older Drivers

GasBuddy Blog -- For those senior citizens looking at a new car, AutoTrader recently released a list of the most recommended in-vehicle features that could make your next drive easier.Car culture was huge when the Baby Boomers were growing up, so it makes sense that as they get older, they're going to want to stay behind the wheel as long as possible," Brian Moody, site editor for AutoTrader.com said. "The technology and features available in vehicles now can do a lot to make sure older drivers are comfortable and safe."While stereotypes may persist that these older drivers may not be as interested in the latest in-car tech features as their tech-savv children, AutoTrader research says otherwise. In a recent study, 62 percent of Baby Boomers (aged 48-66) say technology is an important consideration when shopping for a new car, compared to 61 percent of Millennials. Some tech features AutoTrader editors say older drivers should consider include backup camera, keyl  (go to article)

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Chinese tire brands are no bargain

Fox News -- Consumer Reports is testing more Chinese brands to see/find out about the quality.  (go to article)

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Why the World Bank Shies Away From Energy Efficiency

International Rivers -- The International Energy Agency has estimated that developing countries could save three dollars in investment for power plants for every dollar they invest in efficiency improvements. According to the Agency, such investments “stand out as the cheapest and fastest way to curb demand and emissions growth in the near term”.

The World Bank’s experience with energy efficiency projects confirms this assessment. On average, such projects are considerably more economic than new power stations. Unlike power plants, they don’t degrade the environment and displace local communities. In spite of such benefits, energy efficiency improvements receive short shrift at the World Bank: From 1991 to 2007, the Bank devoted only about 5 percent of its total energy finance to such projects.  (go to article)

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Evacuation order over after pipeline rupture in Berrien County

WSBT News -- The line is owned by Trans Canada and runs from Canada to Texas.

People waited 10 to 12 hours to return home and police say they have conducted air quality testing in the area and so far everything is coming back okay.

But for now, more than 500 people who were evacuated have been allowed to return home.

Vic Rogers, a farmer that lives just a quarter mile from where the blast occurred, says he heard a loud noise around 2 a.m. and came outside to see a geyser of mud and dirt 200 feet in the area.

The area around the pipeline is now swampy.

Rogers says Trans Canada, the company that owns the pipeline, has advised him that his three acres of potatoes around the explosion may be contaminated and should not be harvested.

Rogers says he's lived on this farm his entire life and he recalls a  (go to article)

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U.S. DOE Weekly Petroleum Status Report for Sept. 12 (Text)

Bloomberg -- U.S. crude oil refinery inputs averaged over 16.3 million barrels per day during the week ending September 12, 2014, 28,000 barrels per day less than the previous week’s average. Refineries operated at 93.0% of their operable capacity last week. Gasoline production increased last week, averaging about 9.2 million barrels per day. Distillate fuel production decreased last week, averaging 4.9 million barrels per day.

U.S. crude oil imports averaged over 8.1 million barrels per day last week, up by 493,000 barrels per day from the previous week. Over the last four weeks, crude oil imports averaged about 7.8 million barrels per day, 3.7% below the same four-week period last year. Total motor gasoline imports (including both finished gasoline and gasoline blending components) last week average  (go to article)

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In Effort To Fight Pollution, Beijing Plans To Ban All Coal Use By 2020

HuffPo -- China's smog-plagued capital has announced plans to ban the use of coal by the end of 2020 as the country fights deadly levels of pollution, especially in major cities.

Beijing's Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau posted the plan on its website Monday, saying the city would instead prioritize electricity and natural gas for heating.

The official Xinhua News Agency said coal accounted for a quarter of Beijing's energy consumption in 2012 and 22 percent of the fine particles floating in the city's air. Motor vehicles, industrial production and general dust also contributed to pollution in the 21 million-person city.
 (go to article)

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EIA: Crude oil inventories decrease; gasoline inventory rises

GasBuddy Blog -- The Energy Information Administration released its weekly report on the status of petroleum inventories in the United States today. 
Here are some highlights:

CRUDE INVENTORIES:
Crude oil inventories decreased by 3.7. million barrels to a total of 362.3 million barrels. At 362.3 million barrels, inventories are 1.4 million barrels below last year (0.4%) and are near the upper half of the average range for this time of year.

GASOLINE INVENTORIES:
Gasoline inventories increased by 2.4 million barrels to 212.4 million barrels. At 212.4 million barrels, inventories are up 6.6 million barrels, or 1.9% higher than one year ago. Here's how individual regions and their gasoline inventory fared last week: East Coast (-2.5mb); Midwest (-.2mb); Gulf Coast (+0.5mb); Rockies (+0.1mb); and West Coast (+0.5mb). It is important to note which regions saw increases/decreases as this information likely drives prices up (in the case of fallin  (go to article)

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WTI Crude Falls From 2-Week High on Supplies; Brent Gains

Bloomberg -- West Texas Intermediate crude fell from a two-week high after an industry group was said to report an increase in U.S. inventories.

WTI slid for the first time in three days. The American Petroleum Institute reported yesterday that supplies rose 3.3 million barrels last week, according to Bain Energy. The Energy Information Administration will release its inventory data today. Brent climbed as Libya halted its biggest oil field.

“The build in the API report was quite big,” said Gene McGillian, an analyst and broker at Tradition Energy in Stamford, Connecticut. “If we get a confirmation from the EIA, I won’t be surprised if WTI starts to give up more of yesterday’s gains. Brent is focusing on reports that Libya has reduced production.”  (go to article)

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Clean Transportation Is Driving Us Toward a Low-Carbon Future

HuffPo -- Here in the U.S., our transportation sector produces more carbon dioxide emissions than any other nation's entire economy, except for China and India. Two-thirds of the oil Americans use goes to fuel transportation, with 40 percent of it gassing up personal cars and trucks.

Making cars and trucks dramatically more efficient and developing alternatives to petroleum is a sea change. It is an epic transformation along the lines of switching from the horse and buggy to the horseless carriage, or from landlines to smart phones. Entrepreneurs, investors, and corporations are sniffing out opportunities. Bets are being placed. Fortunes will be made.
The smart money knows that investments that cut emissions from the transportation sector represent attractive opportunities. As nations around the  (go to article)

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U.S. Oil Prices Move Lower Ahead of Inventory Data

Wall St Journal -- U.S. oil prices eased Wednesday ahead of weekly government storage data, after an industry group said that domestic oil stockpiles unexpectedly rose last week.

Analysts expect the U.S. Energy Information Administration to report a 1.2-million-barrel drawdown in oil supplies in the week ended Sept. 12, according to a Wall Street Journal survey. However, the American Petroleum Institute, an industry group, said late Tuesday that its own data for the same week showed a 3.3-million-barrel increase in supplies.

Light, sweet oil for October delivery recently traded down 29 cents, or 0.3%, at $94.59 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

The U.S. benchmark "is weighed down by last night's weekly API report," said Matt Smith, commodity analyst at Schneider Electric SA, an energy-consulti  (go to article)

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Apache seeks to sell some Alberta oil properties

Reuters -- The U.S. independent oil producer continues to winnow its portfolio of international assets

It has put its Provost holdings in E-C AB on the block and that bids are due by mid-Oct. The Provost lands produce about 9,551 boepd and include a 1M acres of exploration property, according to a notice on the website of Scotia Waterous, which is handling the sale

The sale is the latest for Apache as it moves to concentrate on N Am shale fields. In Jul it said it would sell its 50% in the Kitimat LNG planned by Chevron on the Pacific Coast of N BC, along with its stake in the Wheatstone LNG in Australia

Despite the Provost sale, the company still has large land holdings in the Duvernay and Montney shale fields in W Canada as well as conventional properties in AB and SK

“We continue to streamline  (go to article)

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Price Of Gasoline Dips Below $3 Per Gallon Across Tulsa Area

Newson6.com -- A check of gas stations around Tulsa Wednesday morning shows a number stations selling gas for less than $3 a gallon.
While AAA Oklahoma is reporting the average price across the state is $3.23 a gallon, in Tulsa and Owasso, gas stations like the QuikTrip at 11th and Utica have gasoline at $2.99 a gallon.

“Demand is down and WTI crude oil continues to sell in the low-to-mid 90s on the NYMEX,” said AAA Oklahoma spokesman, Chuck Mai. “In addition, now that [gas] stations are selling the cheaper-to-produce winter-grade fuels, the stars are in alignment to bring motorists even lower pump prices this fall.”

AAA expects the national average price of gasoline to drop another 10 to 20 cents by the end of October.  (go to article)

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Strange bedfellows: Solar power meets oil drilling

CNBC -- A company that uses solar energy to recover crude has scored big financing from some major oil players—and highlights a growing niche of global oil exploration.
GlassPoint Solar last week landed a $53 million investment from Royal Dutch Shell and the sovereign investment fund of Oman for its enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technology. In a twist of irony, GlassPont's technology runs on solar power, which produces steam to help pump more fossil fuel from conventional crude plays.
 (go to article)

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Senators chide freight railroads on delays

Houston Chronicle -- The delays, which escalated late last year and continued through the spring and summer, appear to be the result of too few rail cars and too much demand from shippers, officials representing the agriculture, auto and chemical industries told a hearing of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee  (go to article)

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Jim Prentice says many Alberta First Nations are behind new pipeline projects

Yahoo News -- "I can tell you that amongst the strongest allies that AB has at the table are the First Nations of this province who are in the energy business themselves and are passionate about achieving West Coast access," Jim Prentice said Tue

Achieving market access for AB oil and gas is critical. He plans to advocate for more pipelines through his role as premier, but also through his cabinet postings of aboriginal affairs and international and intergovernmental relations

Prentice wants more pipelines to help out the AB economy and to increase revenues for the government

But some experts say there is risk in putting too much emphasis on pipelines, since just about every proposal is stalled or delayed - TransCanada's Keystone XL, Enbridge's Northern Gateway, Line 9, Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain  (go to article)

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Natural-Gas Futures Rise on Demand Hopes

WSJ -- Natural-gas prices climbed Monday on hopes for demand for the fuel after early-season snowstorms hit the northern Midwest. A fatal explosion over the weekend that shut down a pipeline that feeds into the delivery point for the benchmark U.S. contract also spurred bets on tighter supplies.
Natural gas for October delivery rose 7.4 cents, or 1.9%, to $3.931 a million British thermal units on the New York Mercantile Exchange  (go to article)

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US gas prices set to hit 4-year low, analysts say

Fox -- U.S. gas prices this fall are likely to be the cheapest nationwide in four years, thanks in part to greater U.S. crude oil production, more fuel-efficient cars and loosened environmental regulations as the warm weather gives way to autumn, analysts say.

The current GasBuddy.com national average has fallen to $3.38 a gallon, the lowest price since Feb. 22, the company said in a press release Tuesday. The company predicts U.S. average prices will fall to between $3.15 and $3.25 a gallon, and some retailers in up to 30 states could lower their prices below the $3.00 mark in time for the Christmas shopping season.  (go to article)

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'Easy Rider' bike going to auction

Associated Press -- The Captain America chopper Peter Fonda rode in "Easy Rider" is coming to auction.

It's one of the most recognizable motorcycles of all time.

The auction house Profiles in History tells The Associated Press it estimates the Harley-Davidson will bring between $1 million and $1.2 million at its Oct. 18 sale.

The seller is Michael Eisenberg, a California businessman who once co-owned a Los Angeles motorcycle-themed restaurant with Fonda and "Easy Rider" co-star Dennis Hopper.

Eisenberg bought it last year from actor Dan Haggerty. Haggerty was in charge of keeping the custom-designed bike humming during filming.
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Saudi Arabia Expected to Cut Oil Production as Prices Slide

IBTimes -- Saudi Arabia will have to cut oil production to keep prices above $100 a barrel, despite already lowering output, according to two leading French banks.

The world's biggest oil exporter reduced its daily output in August to 408,000 barrels a day in a bid to sustain oil prices as they fell below $100 this month.

Despite geopolitical tension in some the world's biggest crude producing hubs including Russia, Iran and Iraq, crude futures have fallen to their lowest levels since June 2013.
 (go to article)

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When The Power's Out, Solar Panels May Not Keep The Lights On

NPR -- I still think solar power should be the future. Micro grids are the way to go.  (go to article)

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Tesla wins direct sales lawsuit in Mass

autoweek.com -- Massachusetts’ highest court on Monday threw out a lawsuit seeking to block Tesla Motors Inc. from selling its luxury electric cars directly to consumers in the state, enabling it to bypass traditional dealerships.

The state’s Supreme Judicial Court unanimously concluded that the Massachusetts State Automobile Dealers Association and two dealers lacked standing to block direct Tesla sales under a state law designed to protect franchise owners from abuses by car manufacturers.

Justice Margot Botsford wrote that the law was aimed at protecting dealers from unfair practices of manufacturers and distributors “with which they are associated, generally in a franchise relationship,” rather than unaffiliated manufacturers.  (go to article)

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Oil and gas companies court military veterans as shale boom grows

Powersource Post Gazette.com -- John MacZura, an Army infantry veteran, started work a week after graduation.

Before receiving his petroleum engineering degree from Penn State in 2013, Mr. MacZura, 30, had already piqued the interest of five or six oil and gas companies. He had job offers from three. He eventually joined Houston-based Cabot Oil and Gas, where he now works as a completions engineer.

“The military plays a large part in how I got to where I’m at today,” said Mr. MacZura. He spent four years stationed at the Schofield Barracks in Hawaii and two in the National Guard.

“I can’t say I was a commodity, but I was definitely sought after by companies,” he said.

Finding work in the energy sector isn't a new concept for veterans, but there has been an increased interest in recent years due to the shale gas boom.  (go to article)

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Kinetic Energy Tiles, Coming Soon To… Just About Anywhere

Cleantechnica -- We’ve heard about kinetic energy dance floors, train stations, and even speed bumps, but the technology has barely penetrated the commercial market, especially when compared to solar power.

That could all be about to change.

Earlier this week the Daily Mail reported that the world’s first ever soccer field with lights powered by kinetic energy tiles just got its launch in Rio de Janeiro.

Interestingly, the installation, which involves 200 kinetic energy tiles, was sponsored by Royal Dutch Shell of all people (yes, corporations are people, too).
 (go to article)

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Here’s a Natural Gas-Powered Cargo Ship Getting Its 539-Ton Engine

Gizmodo -- Work on TOTE shipholding's new Marlin-class cargo ships is progressing quickly. Late last month crews were photographed installing the vessel's main engine, a 539-ton behemoth that runs on liquefied natural gas rather than diesel.

"This large slow speed (two stroke) dual fuel engine is the first of its kind in the world" said Phil Morrell, Vice President of Commercial Marine Operations for TOTE Services, in a press statement. "Using this engine in our new Marlin class vessels will not only drastically reduce our SOx, NOx, particulate matter and greenhouse gas emissions as a result of using liquefied natural gas, but it will also improve our efficiency meaning these ships will require less energy to travel the same distance and help preserve the environment."

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Nanoribbon film keeps glass ice-free

ScienceDaily -- Rice University scientists who created a deicing film for radar domes have now refined the technology to work as a transparent coating for glass.

The new work by Rice chemist James Tour and his colleagues could keep glass surfaces from windshields to skyscrapers free of ice and fog while retaining their transparency to radio frequencies (RF).

The technology was introduced this month in the American Chemical Society journal Applied Materials and Interfaces.

The material is made of graphene nanoribbons, atom-thick strips of carbon created by splitting nanotubes, a process also invented by the Tour lab. Whether sprayed, painted or spin-coated, the ribbons are transparent and conduct both heat and electricity.
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First water-based nuclear battery can be used to generate electrical energy

Science Daily -- From cell phones to cars and flashlights, batteries play an important role in everyday life. Scientists and technology companies constantly are seeking ways to improve battery life and efficiency. Now, for the first time using a water-based solution, researchers at the University of Missouri have created a long-lasting and more efficient nuclear battery that could be used for many applications such as a reliable energy source in automobiles and also in complicated applications such as space flight.
"Betavoltaics, a battery technology that generates power from radiation, has been studied as an energy source since the 1950s," said Jae W. Kwon, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and nuclear engineering in the College of Engineering at MU. "Controlled nuclear technol  (go to article)

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